A Museum as Entertainment Landscape

 

The Taoyuan Museum of Arts Competition

 


Courtesy: TMOA ©Joe Shih. Architects + Riken Yamamoto and Field Shop

 

 

The competition for the Taoyuan Museum of Arts is similar to now what has become the typical invited format for major projects in Taiwan. In this case, 14 architectural teams submitted their qualifications, and four qualified for the second competition stage. They were Q-LAB + menacoo architecten, Joe Shih. Architects + Riken Yamamoto and Field Shop, Ricky Liu & Associates, and JJPan and Partners, Architects and Planners + MVRDV.

 

 

After the final evaluation was took place on the 28th of February 2018, Joe Shih. Architects + Riken Yamamoto and Field Shop were named the winners with a proposal developing the Museum of Arts as a entertainment landscape hill in the heart of Taoyuan City. Different from most high profile art museums that have appeared on the international scene over the past decades, this one depends almost entirely on a landscape motif as attraction, not a building as symbolic structure. It could be described as a terraced pocket park, with a number of follies on view.

 

 

 

 

 

This museum has three layers of space; the Cube, the Hill and the Inbetween. The Cube is an enclosed exhibition space, and the Hill is a landscape that contains attractions . The Cube and the Hill are connected by the Inbetween, inside of which one can find art installations, performing art and workshops. in addition the terraces include an outside theater. All this is connected by an “inclined lift,” which will connect the various venues. The pop-up boxes serve as multipurpose spaces for commercial and additional exhibition spaces, where artists can sell their works.

 

 

 

Although we haven’t seen the works of the other competitors at this writing, we can assume that the winning design was somewhat of an outlier in the minds of many. But sometimes it takes a totally different approach to win a competition. The final ranking of the participating teams was:

 

 

• First place – Joe Shih. Architects + Riken Yamamoto and Field Shop (Japan)
Second place – Ricky Liu & Associates
Third place – JJPan and Partners, Architects and Planners + MVRDV (The Netherlands)
Fourth place – Q-LAB + menacoo architecten (The Netherlands)

 

 

 


Images: courtesy TMOA ©Joe Shih. Architects + Riken Yamamoto and Field Shop

 

 

Calendar

 

 

Exhibitions and Conferences

 

No events

Recent Archive Updates

Interview: James Mary O’Connor FAIA (Winter 2017)

After receiving his Diploma in Architecture from the Dublin Institute of Technology and BS in Architecture from Trinity College in Dublin, James received his Masters in Architecture from the University of California, Los Angeles while a Fulbright Scholar in the U.S. Shortly after his time as a student in Charles Moore’s Master Class at UCLA, he joined the Moore firm in Los Angeles, now Moore Ruble Yudell. Beginning in the late 1980s, he was involved in the firm’s many projects in Germany, many of which dealt with masterplanning and the construction of large housing, primarily in Berlin. Subsequently, he was involved in the Potatisåkern Master Plan & Housing, as well as the Bo01 Housing Exhibition, both in Malmö, Sweden.
James was MRY’s point person in its subsequent involvement with the firm’s many projects in the People’s Republic of China, beginning with their winning competition proposal for the Century Center project in Beijing. Although unbuilt, it didn’t escape the notice of the Chinese, who invited the firm to participate in a competition for the Tianjin Xin-He large neighborhood masterplan—which they won. This was followed by the 2004 Chun Sen Bi An Housing Masterplan competition in the city of Chongqing, located in central China—completed in 2010. This high profile project resulted in a number of affordable and high-end housing projects throughout China. The firm’s most remarkable sustainability project was the COFCO Agricultural Eco-Valley Master Plan project outside Beijing, envisioned to become the first net zero-carbon project of its kind in the world.
In the meantime, the firm’s focus in China has evolved from its concentration on housing to institutional projects, such as the Shanghai University of Technology‘s research buildings. In the meantime MRY has been noted as a leader in the design of campus projects in the U.S. and abroad, as well as numerous government projects—courthouses and embassies.

 

 

Interview: Michael Sorkin (2014 Surfer’s Paradise Precinct Juror)

MichaelSorkin

 

COMPETITIONS: I assume you attended sessions during both stages of the competition, How long did they last?

 

Michael Sorkin: I think they were both a couple of days each. At the second session there were presentations by the teams, which were long enough. It was very professionally and equitably organized.

 

COMPETITIONS: Although the competition brief was only 29 pages, I thought it was one of the best documents of that type I have come across.

 

MS: It was very succinct and well done. I have been involved with the people who were engaged in the organization of the competition before, and there was a very high level of competence.

 

COMPETITIONS: As for the jury, was it about the right number?

 

MS: It was a very congenial group. There was no violence, but there was a good discussion. Everybody was looking for a good outcome, and we did end up picking one of the most visionary schemes submitted. I would say that in terms of the way that the projects progressed from the shortlist to the final presentation, these people (the winner) did an extraordinary job. Theirs was the scheme that was the most thoroughly mature in that process.

Read more...