Interview: Will Alsop (Winter 2002) with George Kapelos

 

with George Kapelos

 

Interview 1
Swansea Literature Center (competition 1993)


KAPELOS: What led you to architecture?

 

ALSOP: I want to start by saying that I never remember not wanting to be an architect. Why that should be I have no idea. I grew up in England in Northampton near a Peter Behrens house. It was one of the first modern movement houses in the UK, built around 1926 and it had an interior done by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. As a child you were always aware of this house. My parents had different views on this house. My mother thought it was incredibly ugly, while my father, who was 64 when I was born, hated Victorian architecture. Their views influenced me. I got to like the house—I even found it fascinating—it was comfortable and I responded to its ambiance. Plus it had extraordinary furnishings, so I guess this is where I started.

 

KAPELOS: What were your earliest experiences with architecture?

 

ALSOP: My father died when I was quite young—I was 15—and I went to work for a local architectural firm. This office was not what I considered to be ‘architecture.’ I measured buildings and did rudimentary working drawings. The practice was disappointing. One of the partners, Brian Pennock, thought of the design process as first getting the plan right and then designing the building’s elevations. It struck me curious that you wouldn’t think of the building as a whole. The plan and the object were one, in my thinking. Pennock was trained along the lines of ‘form follows function.’ In this line of thinking everything would come from the plan. Pennock, in my opinion, was deliberately obscuring his sensibility. I have been suspicious of this or any methodology ever since. You can teach people to build, but ‘architecture’ is something else. That’s what I want to be paid for. The something else, that’s where you put the most value.

 

Pompidou Centre

Second Place, Centre Georges Pompidou competition (1971)

 

KAPELOS: What about your early exposure to art and sculpture?

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